Why We Should Avoid Get-Rich-Quick Seminars?

Investment seminars are very common. They can be found in both developing and developed countries. Researches show that more than 50 percent people have received invitations for these seminars. Unfortunately, instead of getting free instructions; new investors could be duped out of huge amount of money. Bad investment seminars could be masqueraded as something educational.

They purportedly try to teach investors how to grow their money. They usually favour aggressive selling and may hustle attendees into spending some amount of money for tons of promises.

Unfortunately, many new investors still don’t realize that high returns are equal to bigger risks. In reality, these motivators are very capable marketers. They understand how to employ high-pressure technique to grab money from attendees. They can offer plans with outrageous promises, such as 10,000 percent returns. While many people are sensible enough to sense traps, others could be encouraged to take immediate actions and spend some money.

These motivators may use common manipulative tricks, such as saying that there are only a few spots left. This way, the audience will be given less time to think.

In fact, some of the audiences are actually accomplices and they will act as people who are motivated by the offer. After seeing three or four people spending their money for the offer, others could follow. In the end, dozens could immediately spend their money. We should be aware that some of these motivators are interested only in our money. There are many things that motivators may offer in their seminars.

As an example, they could try to lure attendees onto overpriced courses. They could also be encouraged to purchase CDs and books. In the end, they are just outright scams to steal our money.

Another very common tactic is to entice attendees into allocating their savings into specific annuities or insurance products. Others may also offer land, properties or bonds from an exotic foreign country. Many motivators make good living selling financial services through seminars. In some cases, it is possible for them to draw in nearly $1 million from larger seminars. But in average, it is possible for motivators to get $100,000 per seminar. In general, people could use punchy titles to encourage and attract people.

Each year, probably millions of people attend such seminars and this has become a kind of industry. Motivators may often say that that had very successful careers in huge corporate, but they left the job for the opportunity. They may give us a glimpse into a supposedly wonderful secret, but it is actually have less than ideal application.

Each seminar may last for a couple of house and in some cases; it is a two- or three-day course. The first day could be free, while subsequent days could cost investors a few thousand dollars. Unfortunately, many of attendees find that the follow-up sessions provide very little new information. Books and CDs that supposedly provide killer tricks actually filled with basic or outdated methods. While these instructions may fool beginners, more experienced attendees could immediately spot mistakes.